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You are watching: Polaris sportsman 500 spark plug gap

Which spark plug and gap for a 2001 Sportsman 500?The books l have differ?I have BKR5ES. It had BKR6E gapped at .036The Polaris manual says .024 to .028 for gap. The other manual says.036 for gap. I have seen factory manuals have incorrect info before.14 ft lbs torque for spark plug
The third manual says BKR5E. WITH A .036 GAP. Would an Iridium plug be better? What number and gap?The only plugs I"ve dealt much with, were glow plugs
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While the 2001 specified a BKR5E, the 2002 specified a BKR6E - The only difference is the 6 is a heat range colder than the 5 - the 6 is more likely to foul in cold climes, but you can use either the 5 or the 6 - your choice - it makes no difference to the engine until it reaches full operating temperature.From NGK:The term heat range refers to the speed with which a plug can transfer heat from the combustion chamber to the engine head. Whether the plug is to be installed in a boat, lawnmower or race car, it has been found the optimum combustion chamber temperature for gasoline engines is between 500°C–850°C. Within that range it is cool enough to avoid pre-ignition and plug tip overheating (which can cause engine damage), while still hot enough to burn off combustion deposits that cause fouling.In identical spark plug types, the difference from one full heat range to the next is the ability to remove 70°C (appx. 160*F) to 100°C (212*F) from the combustion chamber.Iridium spark plugs:NGK Iridium IX" spark plugs feature a fine wire center electrode that reduces the amount of voltage-energy needed to create a spark. Since the fine wire tip construction lowers the voltage requirement, ignition efficiency is improved. This makes for easier starting, quicker throttle response, stronger mid range pull and better top end performance.The theory behind the fine wire spark plug is relatively easy to explain. It is easier to push voltage through a thin wire than a thick wire. This means less voltage to bridge the gap, less stress on the ignition system and more power.Even with an iridium plug, the gap should still be .036" - that is what the ignition system is designed for.